It occurred to me recently that I have been remiss in not writing about a very important rule that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) published last September.  HUD Rule 100.600 profoundly impacts landlords in two primary ways: 1) it creates liability for landlords who fail to take action to correct a hostile environment; and 2) it prohibits “quid pro quo” harassment.  This blog post will focus on the first prohibition, hostile environment harassment.  In a subsequent post, I will address “quid pro quo” harassment.

HUD Rule Section 100.600(A)(2) defines hostile environment harassment as “unwelcome conduct that is sufficiently severe or pervasive to interfere with the availability, sale, rental, or use or enjoyment of a dwelling; the terms, conditions, or privileges of the sale or rental, or the provision or enjoyment of services or facilities in connection with the sale or rental; or the availability, terms, or conditions of a residential real estate-related transaction.”  In other words, the Rule acts to prohibit harassment or bullying based on a protected characteristic.  Whether hostile environment harassment exists depends on the totality of the circumstances, looking at factors such as “the nature of the conduct, the context in which the incident(s) occurred, the severity, scope, frequency, duration, and location of the conduct, and the relationships of the persons involved.”  Basically, in determining whether hostile environment harassment has occurred, a court will review the foregoing factors from the standpoint of a “reasonable” person in the aggrieved person’s position.  Hopefully, a review of these factors will help to distinguish minor disagreements between individuals from actual harassment.

Obviously, as a landlord, you need to ensure that your employees are not creating a hostile environment for any of the residents.  But do you need to care if one resident is harassing another resident? Yes. Yes you do.  Under the new rule, you as the landlord can be directly liable for resident-on-resident harassment if you knew (or should have known) of the harassment and you fail to take prompt action to end the harassment.  So, if an employee of a management company knows that one resident is harassing another resident and the management company fails to take corrective action, then the management company will be liable under the new HUD rule (presuming, of course, that the management company has the authority to stop the harassment).

Interestingly enough, and following a theme that I wrote about earlier, HUD also stated in the preamble to the rule it “reaffirms its view that under the Fair Housing Act, discrimination based on gender identity is sex discrimination. Accordingly, quid pro quo or hostile environment harassment in housing because of a person’s gender identity is indistinguishable from harassment because of sex.”

So what’s the bottom line?  Well, in all honesty, it is probably common sense.  Landlords and management companies should act promptly to stop any and all harassment on the property, whether it is committed by one of their employees, or by a resident.  Simply put, always act promptly to stop harassment, wherever and whenever it occurs.